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About the Book

Constitutional Law 5E

Front Cover - Constitutional Law 5E

Fifth Edition


Erwin Chemerinsky
University of California, Irvine

2017. 1968 pages. ISBN: 978-1-4548-7647-2. 

About the Book

A leading text by a prominent scholar, Constitutional Law is known for its concise, yet comprehensive presentation. Professor Chemerinsky’s distinctive approach presents the law solely through case excerpts and his own essays. With the author’s context and background information, the law becomes more readily understood. A flexible organization accommodates a variety of course structures; no chapter assumes that students have read preceding material. A complete Teacher's Manual and Annual Case Supplement round out this acclaimed text. 

The Fifth Edition introduces a streamlined presentation for even greater manageability. Major new cases are reviewed, including Shelby County, Alabama v. Holder (scope of Congressional power); Fisher v. University of Texas, Austin (racial classifications benefiting minorities); United States v. Windsor and Obergefell v. Hodges (right to marry); Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt (right to abortion); and Sorrell v. IMS Health Inc. (commercial speech).

Hallmark features of Constitutional Law:
concise, yet comprehensive presentation
distinctive approach presents the law solely through case excerpts and author-written essays
context and background information for greater understanding
flexible organization—no chapter assumes that students have read the rest
straightforward, accessible writing style
• comprehensive Teacher’s Manual
Annual Case Supplement

Thoroughly updated, the revised Fifth Edition presents:
• a streamlined presentation for greater manageability
• inclusion of major new cases, these among them:
• Zivotofsky v. Kerry (foreign policy and domestic affairs)
• Shelby County, Alabama v. Holder (scope of Congressional powers)
• Fisher v. University of Texas, Austin (racial classifications benefiting minorities)
• United States v. Windsor (right to marry)
• Obergefell v. Hodges (right to marry)
• Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt (government regulation of abortions)
• Reed v. Town of Gilbert (importance of the distinction between content-based and content-neutral laws)
• Williams-Yulee v. Florida State Bar (determining whether a law is content-based) 
• Walker v. Texas Division, Sons of Confederate Veterans (problems in applying the distinction between content-based and content-neutral laws)
• Sorrell v. IMS Health Inc. (commercial speech)
• Town of Greece v. Galloway (legislative chaplains)

Preface / Sample Chapters